Outward Forms And Symbols Used To Convey Intellectual Conceptions – Abdu’l-Baha

Outward Forms And Symbols Must Be Used To Convey Intellectual Conceptions

 

“A subject that is essential for the comprehension of the questions that we have mentioned, and of others of which we are about to speak, so that the essence of the problems may be understood, is this: that human knowledge is of two kinds. One is the knowledge of things perceptible to the senses—that is to say, things which the eye, or ear, or smell, or taste, or touch can perceive, which are called objective or sensible. So the sun, because it can be seen, is said to be objective; and in the same way sounds are sensible because the ear hears them; perfumes are sensible because they can be inhaled and the sense of smell perceives them; foods are sensible because the palate perceives their sweetness, sourness or saltness; heat and cold are sensible because the feelings perceive them. These are said to be sensible realities.

 

“The other kind of human knowledge is intellectual—that is to say, it is a reality of the intellect; it has no outward form and no place and is not perceptible to the senses. For example, the power of intellect is not sensible; none of the inner qualities of man is a sensible thing; on the contrary, they are intellectual realities. So love is a mental reality and not sensible; for this reality the ear does not hear, the eye does not see, the smell does not perceive, the taste does not discern, the touch does not feel. Even ethereal matter, the forces of which are said in physics to be heat, light, electricity and magnetism, is an intellectual reality, and is not sensible. In the same way, nature, also, in its essence is an intellectual reality and is not sensible; the human spirit is an intellectual, not sensible reality. In explaining these intellectual realities, one is obliged to express them by sensible figures because in exterior existence there is nothing that is not material. Therefore, to explain the reality of the spirit—its condition, its station—one is obliged to give explanations under the forms of sensible things because in the external world all that exists is sensible. For example, grief and happiness are intellectual things; when you wish to express those spiritual qualities you say: ‘My heart is oppressed; my heart is dilated,’ though the heart of man is neither oppressed nor dilated. This is an intellectual or spiritual state, to explain which you are obliged to have recourse to sensible figures. Another example: you say, ‘such an individual made great progress,’ though he is remaining in the same place; or again, ‘such a one’s position was exalted,’ although, like everyone else, he walks upon the earth. This exaltation and this progress are spiritual states and intellectual realities, but to explain them you are obliged to have recourse to sensible figures because in the exterior world there is nothing that is not sensible.

 

“So the symbol of knowledge is light, and of ignorance, darkness; but reflect, is knowledge sensible light, or ignorance sensible darkness? No, they are merely symbols. These are only intellectual states, but when you desire to express them outwardly, you call knowledge light, and ignorance darkness. You say: ‘My heart was gloomy, and it became enlightened.’ Now, that light of knowledge, and that darkness of ignorance, are intellectual realities, not sensible ones; but when we seek for explanations in the external world, we are obliged to give them a sensible form.

 

“Then it is evident that the dove which descended upon Christ was not a material dove, but it was a spiritual state, which, that it might be comprehensible, was expressed by a sensible figure. Thus in the Old Testament it is said that God appeared as a pillar of fire: this does not signify the material form; it is an intellectual reality which is expressed by a sensible image.

 

“Christ says, ‘The Father is in the Son, and the Son is in the Father.’ Was Christ within God, or God within Christ? No, in the name of God! On the contrary, this is an intellectual state which is expressed in a sensible figure.

 

“We come to the explanation of the words of Bahá’u’lláh when He says: ‘O king! I was but a man like others, asleep upon My couch, when lo, the breezes of the All-Glorious were wafted over Me, and taught Me the knowledge of all that hath been. This thing is not from Me, but from One Who is Almighty and All-Knowing.’ This is the state of manifestation: it is not sensible; it is an intellectual reality, exempt and freed from time, from past, present and future; it is an explanation, a simile, a metaphor and is not to be accepted literally; it is not a state that can be comprehended by man. Sleeping and waking is passing from one state to another. Sleeping is the condition of repose, and wakefulness is the condition of movement. Sleeping is the state of silence; wakefulness is the state of speech. Sleeping is the state of mystery; wakefulness is the state of manifestation.

 

“For example, it is a Persian and Arabic expression to say that the earth was asleep, and the spring came, and it awoke; or the earth was dead, and the spring came, and it revived. These expressions are metaphors, allegories, mystic explanations in the world of signification.

 

“Briefly, the Holy Manifestations have ever been, and ever will be, Luminous Realities; no change or variation takes place in Their essence. Before declaring Their manifestation, They are silent and quiet like a sleeper, and after Their manifestation, They speak and are illuminated, like one who is awake.”

 

(Some Answered Questions, pp. 83-86) Author: ‘Abdu’l-Bahá

Lynette Wilson, Publisher
Author: Lynette Wilson, Publisher

Lynette grew up in the small Wisconsin town of Boscobel, home of the Gideon Bible. After attending college at the University of Wisconsin, Madison and Platteville achieving an A.A. degree she decided a break was needed n order to figure out which academic discipline she wanted to pursue. While contemplating intensely on her choices she met and married Fernando. Lynette returned to college and studied Small Business Management and Bookkeeping. After several years of working in management she found herself once again meditating on her future. The powers that be answered and she returned to the academic life in pursuit of a double major in Physical and Occupational Therapy. She found time to assist in the Special Resource Center helping quadriplegics and the legally blind in the classroom setting as well as reading for the blind. In the midst of her professional goals she had a difficult pregnancy which temporarily (...so she thought) would interrupt her coursework. She attempted to return to her studies, but the stork visited a second time. After the birth of their daughter, an unwelcomed visitor arrived a year and a half later, Brain Cancer. After 7 years of fighting, Fernando passed away. (2003) This experience led Lynette down another path-Nursing. She returned to college again in 2008 after 12 successful years in the automobile industry as a Business Development Center Director and Toyota Master Certified Customer Relations Manager (yes, more schooling...she studied through Toyota University for that title!). She completed her nursing studies in a class with students the age of her children (sigh) and was now a Certified Licensed Vocational Nurse. She remarried in 2010 and became a new mother again to a beautiful stepdaughter. As trouble seems to seek Lynette out, her nursing career was short-lived; she suffered an injury while assisting a patient; an injury she is working to overcome. Lynette is Publisher and Co-Founder of Baha’i Studies in the Covenant and All Things Baha’i in addition to several online forums and web page. She is now under the tutelage of Mike Moum as she learns how to navigate the technical aspects of blogging. She became a Baha’i in 1989 and has served as Baha’i Representative at California State University of Long Beach, Interfaith Center and in other elected and appointed positions in the Baha'i Faith.

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